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Manasa, vacha, karmana

Manasa, vaacha, karmana are three Sanskrit words. The word manasa refers to the mind, vaachaa refers to speech, and karmanaa refers to actions. In several Indian languages, these three words are together used to describe a state of consistency ex ...

                                               

Maqbara

The Arabic word Maqbara is derived from the word Qabr, which means grave. Though maqbara refers to the graves of all Muslims, it refers especially to a Muslim cemetery. In some Islamic cultures it refers also to the graves of religious figures or ...

                                               

Marquesan tattoo

A Marquesan tattoo is a tattoo design originating from the Marquesas Islands of the South Pacific. Marquesan tattoos can be recognized by trademark symbols, such as geckos, centipedes, Tiis, the Marquesan Cross and other geometric designs. Marque ...

                                               

Masquerade ceremony

A masquerade ceremony is a cultural or religious event involving the wearing of masks. In the Dogon religion, the traditional beliefs of the Dogon people of Mali, there are several mask dances, some of which include the Sigi festival.The Sigi ent ...

                                               

Mejeriet

Mejeriet, or Kulturmejeriet, is a cultural venue in Lund, Sweden, which opened in 1987. It originally started as a co-operative dairy in 1896 by the corner of Malmovagen and the Lund-Revinge-Harlosa railroad. The dairy itself closed in 1968. The ...

                                               

The Modern Project

The Modern Project is a general name for the political and philosophical movement that gave rise to modernity, broadly understood. This endeavor was begun by certain figures in the late Middle Ages and Renaissance to uproot Western culture from i ...

                                               

Money-rich, time-poor

Money-rich, time-poor is an expression which arose in Britain at the end of the 20th century to describe groups of people who, whilst having a high disposable income through well-paid employment, have relatively little leisure time as a result. T ...

                                               

Monkey see, monkey do

Monkey see, monkey do is a pidgin-style saying that appeared in American culture in the early 1920s. The saying refers to the learning of a process without an understanding of why it works. Another definition implies the act of mimicry, usually w ...

                                               

Muiderkring

The Muiderkring was the name given to a group of figures in the arts and sciences who regularly met at the castle of Muiden near Amsterdam during the later half of the 17th Century, or the Golden Age of the Dutch Republic. The central figure of t ...

                                               

National Hollerin' Contest

The National Hollerin Contest, first held in 1969, is an annual competition held in Spiveys Corner, North Carolina. The contest, formerly held on the third Saturday in June, was inaugurated to revive the almost-lost art of "hollerin", a sophistic ...

                                               

New York Tattoo Museum

The New York Tattoo Museum was a museum located at 203 Old Town Road in Staten Islands Old Town neighborhood. It was reported to be the first tattoo museum to open in New York City. By 2017, the museum had closed.

                                               

Nozem

Nozem was a term during the 1950s and 1960s to describe self-conscient, rebellious youth, often aggressive and considered problematic by authorities in the Netherlands. It was the earliest modern Dutch subculture, related to the Teddy Boy movemen ...

                                               

Okhotsk culture

The Okhotsk culture is an archaeological coastal fishing and hunter-gatherer culture of the lands surrounding the Sea of Okhotsk. The historical Okhotsk people were related to the Nivkhs and possibly the Itelmens. It is suggested that the Okhotsk ...

                                               

Old Cordilleran Culture

The Old Cordilleran Culture, also known as the Cascade phase, is an ancient culture of Native Americans that settled in the Pacific Northwestern region of North America that existed from 9000 or 10000 BC until about 5500 BC. The Cascade phase may ...

                                               

Opening ceremony

An opening ceremony, grand opening, or ribbon-cutting ceremony marks the official opening of a newly-constructed location or the start of an event. Opening ceremonies at large events such as the Olympic Games, FIFA World Cup, and the Rugby World ...

                                               

Para (Bengali)

Para is a Bengali word which means a neighbourhood or locality, usually characterised by a strong sense of community. The names of several localities in cities and villages of West Bengal, Bangladesh and Tripura end with the suffix para. Historic ...

                                               

Parley

Parley is a discussion or conference, especially one between enemies over terms of a truce or other matters. During the 18th and 19th centuries, attacking an enemy during a parley was considered one of the grossest breaches of the rules of war. T ...

                                               

The Pauline Quirke Academy

The Pauline Quirke Academy of Performing Arts is a multi-site performing arts Academy for young people aged 4–18. Students spend three hours rotating through hour-long sessions in Comedy & Drama, Musical Theatre and Film & Television. Students ar ...

                                               

Periferic

Periferic is an international biennial of contemporary art initiated in 1997 as a performance festival by the Romanian artist Matei Bejenaru. It is organized in Iasi, Romania by the Vector Association, and takes its name from the "centre-peripher ...

                                               

Personification of Russia

Since medieval times personifications of Russia are traditionally feminine, and most commonly are maternal. Most common terms for national personification of Russia are: Mother Motherland Russian: Родина-мать, tr. Rodina-mat. Mother Russia, In th ...

                                               

Petty tyranny

Petty tyranny is authority exercised by a leader, usually one unchosen by the led, in a relatively limited or an intimate environment, such as that exercised by a fellow peer of a social group. It is a pejorative term, that carries with it a sens ...

                                               

Pictish Beast

The Pictish Beast is not easily identifiable with any real animal, but resembles a seahorse, especially when depicted upright. Suggestions have included a dolphin, a kelpie or each uisge, and even the Loch Ness Monster. Recent thinking is that th ...

                                               

Pleasance Theatre Trust

The Pleasance Theatre Trust is a venue operator and producer of live events, known internationally for being one of the major, so-called "Big Four", operators at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the worlds largest arts festival. The trust is named ...

                                               

Poison ring

A poison ring or pillbox ring is a type of ring with a container under the bezel or inside the bezel itself which could be used to hold poison or another substance; they became popular in Europe during the sixteenth century. The poison ring was u ...

                                               

Political culture of the United Kingdom

The political culture of the United Kingdom was described by the political scientists Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba as a deferential civic culture. In the United Kingdom, factors such as class and regionalism and the nations history such as the ...

                                               

Postliterate society

A postliterate society is a hypothetical society in which multimedia technology has advanced to the point where literacy, the ability to read or write, is no longer necessary or common. The term appears as early as 1962 in Marshall McLuhans The G ...

                                               

Preah Thong and Neang Neak

Preah Thong and Neang Neak are symbolic personas in Khmer culture. They are thought to have founded the pre-Angkorian state of Funan. Much of Khmer wedding customs can be traced back to the marriage of Preah Thong and Neang Neak. According to rep ...

                                               

Private view

A private view is a special viewing of an art exhibition by invitation only, normal at the start of a public exhibition. Typically wine and light refreshments are served on the form of a reception. If the artworks are by a living artist, it is no ...

                                               

Program book

A program book is a printed schedule of meeting events, locations of function rooms, location of exhibitors, and other pertinent information pertaining to a convention or conference. It is customary in many cases to sell advertising in program bo ...

                                               

Protome

Protomes were often used to decorate ancient Greek architecture, sculpture, and pottery. Protomes were also used in Persian monuments. At Persepolis ca. 521-465 BCE, an array of stone fluted Persian columns topped by bull protomes distinguish the ...

                                               

Puppy face

A puppy face or a puppy dog face is a facial expression that humans make that is based on canine expressions. In dogs and other animals, the look is expressed when the head is tilted down and the eyes are looking up. Usually, the animal looks lik ...

                                               

Pureland origami

Pureland origami is a style of origami invented by the British paper folder John Smith that is limited to using only mountain and valley folds. The aim of Pureland origami is to make origami easier for inexperienced folders and those who have imp ...

                                               

Rauza

Rauza, Rouza, Roza is a Perso-Arabic term used in Middle East and Indian subcontinent which means shrine or tomb. It is also known as mazār, maqbara or dargah. The word rauza is derived through Persian from the Arabic rawdah Arabic: روضة rawdah m ...

                                               

Satsumon culture

The Satsumon culture is a post-Jōmon, partially agricultural, archeological culture of northern Honshu and southern Hokkaido that has been identified as the Emishi, as a Japanese-Emishi mixed culture, as the incipient modern Ainu, or with all thr ...

                                               

Saudi women in the arts

In 1963 Thuraya Qabil became the first Saudi woman in the Hijaz to publish a poetry collection, with The Weeping Rhythms ; she and other women from the region, including Fatna Shakir, Abdiya Khayyat, and Huda Dabbagh, became prominent in Saudi le ...

                                               

Scientific and Cultural Facilities District

The Scientific and Cultural Facilities District is a special regional tax district of the State of Colorado that provides funding for art, music, theater, dance, zoology, botany, natural history, or cultural history organizations in the Denver Me ...

                                               

Scottish cringe

The Scottish cringe is a cultural cringe relating to Scotland, and claimed to exist by politicians and commentators. These cultural commentators claim that a sense of cultural inferiority is felt by many Scots, particularly in relation to a perce ...

                                               

Seat filler

A seat filler is a person who fills in an empty seat during an event. There are two types of seat fillers: a person who takes up spare seats when the person allocated the seat is elsewhere. An example of this is the Academy Awards in which member ...

                                               

Self-clasping handshake

A self-clasping handshake is a gesture in which one hand is grasped by the other and held together in front of the body or over the head. In the United States, this gesture is a sign of victory, being made by the winning boxer at the end of a fig ...

                                               

Self-deprecation

Self-deprecation is the act of reprimanding oneself by belittling, undervaluing, or disparaging oneself, or being excessively modest. It can be used in humor and tension release.

                                               

Shen Dzu

Shen Dzu or God Pig, sometimes known as Holy pig, are pigs that have been chronically fattened for use in Hakka religious and cultural ceremonies, for example, the Lunar New Year celebration in Sanxia, northern Taiwan. Pigs are fattened in a proc ...

                                               

Shrug

A shrug is a gesture performed by raising both shoulders, and is a representation of an individual either being indifferent about something or not knowing an answer to a question. A shrug is an emblem, meaning that it integrates the vocabulary of ...

                                               

Shyrdak

A shyrdak or syrmak is a stitched, and often colourful felt floor-covering, usually handmade in Central Asia. Kazakhs and Kyrgyz alike traditionally make shyrdaks, but especially in Kyrgyzstan, the tradition is still alive, and many of the produc ...

                                               

Sihasapa

The Sihasapa or Blackfoot Sioux are a division of the Lakota people, Titonwan, or Teton. Sihasapa is the Lakota word for "Blackfoot", whereas Siksika has the same meaning in the Blackfoot language. As a result, the Sihasapa have the same English ...

                                               

Silent service code

The silent service code is a way for a diner to "talk" to servers during a meal without saying a word, mainly to tell them that the diner is finished. This will prevent any embarrassing situations where the server would take a meal prematurely. T ...

                                               

Sleepover

A sleepover, also known as a pajama party or a slumber party, is a party, most commonly held by children or teenagers, where a guest or guests are invited to stay overnight at the home of a friend, sometimes to celebrate birthdays or other specia ...

                                               

South-German Urnfield culture

The South-German Urnfield culture developed in the regions of Southern Germany in the Bronze Age. The culture existed as early as 1000 B.C.E. The culture made Late Bronze Age pottery, including storage pots with "bulging body, more or less everte ...

                                               

Splat wall

A splat wall is a large wall made from Velcro to which people can stick themselves. A splat wall can be within the interpretation of the Occupiers Liability Act 1957 as something that is seen to be a premises. See the case of Gwilliam v West Hert ...

                                               

Srulik

Srulik is a cartoon character symbolizing Israel. The character was created in 1956 by the Israeli cartoonist Kariel Gardosh, known by his pen name Dosh. The cartoon appeared for many years in the newspaper Maariv. Yosef Lapid, Doshs colleague on ...

                                               

St Francis' Boy's Home

St Francis Boys Home in Shefford, Bedfordshire was the longest serving childrens home in England. Founded in 1868, it played a vital role in providing care provision for children who could not live at home. The origins of this demand was facilita ...

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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